Dry Stout Recipes

[Here’s a dry stout recipe, all-grain and extract versions, presented in both English units and metric units.]

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The Cure from Cork 

(Murphy’s-like Dry Stout/all-grain)

by Chris Colby

 

DESCRIPTION

This is a dry stout reminiscent of Murphy’s Pub Draught, now sold in widget cans. Murphy’s stout is slightly mellower — a little less bitter with a hint of chocolate and caramel in the malt — than Guinness, and (in my opinion) also tastes better when carbonated with CO2, as opposed to pushed with beer gas. If you like session ales — and are disappointed you can’t find Murphy’s except in widget cans — this is a great recipe to try.

INGREDIENTS (for 5 gallons)

 

Water Profile 

80 ppm calcium (Ca+2)

20 ppm magnesium (Mg+2)

240 ppm carbonate (HCO3)

Malts and Other Fermentables

(for an OG of 1.038 at 70% efficiency and an SRM of 41)

5 lb. 4.0 oz. English pale ale malt

12 oz. cane sugar

2.0 oz. dark crystal malt (90 °L)

3.0 oz. chocolate malt

10 oz. roasted barley (500 °L)

Hops (for 34 IBU total)

Target hops (34 IBUs)

0.9 oz. (at 10% alpha acids), boiled for 60 minutes

Yeast (to attenuate to FG 1.007, for an ABV of 4.1%)

White Labs WLP007 (Dry English Ale) yeast

(a 1 qt. yeast starter is suggested)

Processing Aids and Other 

0.25 tsp. yeast nutrients

4 oz. corn sugar (to prime bottles for 2.0 volumes of CO2)

 

PROCEDURE

Make yeast starter 2 days before brewing. Crush dark grains separately from pale malt. (You will likely need to tighten the mill gap a bit for the smaller dark grains.) Mash grains at 150 °F in 7.75 quarts of brewing liquor for 45 minutes. Mash out to 168 °F. Recirculate wort, then begin running off. Sparge until final runnings drop below 1.008 (or pH rises about 5.8) or until runnings taste exceedingly astringent. Add water to make pre-boil volume of 6.5 gallons. Boil wort hard for 90 minutes, adding hops at times indicated. Stir in sugar and yeast nutrients for final 15 minutes of the boil. Cool wort and rack to fermenter. Aerate well, pitch yeast and ferment at 70 °F. Keg or bottle condition. (You can keg this and push with nitrogen if you like, but I think it tastes better with “normal” (CO2) bubbles.

 

The Cure from Cork 

(Murphy’s-like Dry Stout/all-grain, metric units)

by Chris Colby

 

DESCRIPTION

This is a dry stout reminiscent of Murphy’s Pub Draught, now sold in widget cans. Murphy’s stout is slightly mellower — a little less bitter with a hint of chocolate and caramel in the malt — than Guinness, and (in my opinion) also tastes better when carbonated with CO2, as opposed to pushed with beer gas. If you like session ales — and are disappointed you can’t find Murphy’s except in widget cans — this is a great recipe to try.

 

INGREDIENTS (for 19 L)

 

Water Profile 

80 ppm calcium (Ca+2)

20 ppm magnesium (Mg+2)

240 ppm carbonate (HCO3)

Malts and Other Fermentables

(for an OG of 1.038 at 70% efficiency and an SRM of 41)

2.38 kg  English pale ale malt

340 g cane sugar

57 g dark crystal malt (90 °L)

85 g chocolate malt

280 g roasted barley (500 °L)

Hops (for 34 IBU total)

Target hops (34 IBUs)

26 g (at 10% alpha acids), boiled for 60 minutes

Yeast (to attenuate to FG 1.007, for an ABV of 4.1%)

White Labs WLP007 (Dry English Ale) yeast

(a 1-L yeast starter is suggested)

Processing Aids and Other 

0.25 tsp. yeast nutrients

110 g corn sugar (to prime bottles for 2.0 volumes of CO2)

 

PROCEDURE

Make yeast starter 2 days before brewing. Crush dark grains separately from pale malt. (You will likely need to tighten the mill gap a bit for the smaller dark grains.) Mash grains at 66 °C in 7.3 L of brewing liquor for 45 minutes. Mash out to 76 °C. Recirculate wort, then begin running off. Sparge until final runnings drop below 1.008 (or pH rises about 5.8) or until runnings taste exceedingly astringent. Add water to make pre-boil volume of 25 L. Boil wort hard for 90 minutes, adding hops at times indicated. Stir in sugar and yeast nutrients for final 15 minutes of the boil. Cool wort and rack to fermenter. Aerate well, pitch yeast and ferment at 21 °C. Keg or bottle condition. (You can keg this and push with nitrogen if you like, but I think it tastes better with “normal” (CO2) bubbles.

 

The Cure from Cork 

(Murphy’s-like Dry Stout/extract)

by Chris Colby

 

DESCRIPTION

This is a dry stout reminiscent of Murphy’s Pub Draught, now sold in widget cans. Murphy’s stout is slightly mellower — a little less bitter with a hint of chocolate and caramel in the malt — than Guinness, and (in my opinion) also tastes better when carbonated with CO2, as opposed to pushed with beer gas. If you like session ales — and are disappointed you can’t find Murphy’s except in widget cans — this is a great recipe to try.

 

INGREDIENTS (for 5 gallons)

 

Water Profile 

80 ppm calcium (Ca+2)

20 ppm magnesium (Mg+2)

240 ppm carbonate (HCO3)

Malts and Other Fermentables

(for an OG of 1.038 at 70% efficiency and an SRM of 41)

2.0 lbs. English pale ale malt

2.0 lbs. light dried malt extract

12 oz. cane sugar

2.0 oz. dark crystal malt (90 °L)

3.0 oz. chocolate malt

10 oz. roasted barley (500 °L)

Hops (for 34 IBU total)

Target hops (34 IBUs)

0.9 oz. (at 10% alpha acids), boiled for 60 minutes

Yeast (to attenuate to FG 1.007, for an ABV of 4.1%)

White Labs WLP007 (Dry English Ale) yeast

(a 1-qt. yeast starter is suggested)

Processing Aids and Other 

0.25 tsp. yeast nutrients

4 oz. corn sugar (to prime bottles for 2.0 volumes of CO2)

 

PROCEDURE

Make yeast starter 2 days before brewing. If milling your own grains, crush dark grains separately from pale malt. (You will likely need to tighten the mill gap a bit for the smaller dark grains.) Put crushed grains in a large steeping bag. (You will have just short of 3 pounds of grain total). In a large pot (over 1.5 gallons) other than your brewpot, steep the grains at 150 °F in 4 quarts of brewing liquor (treated brewing water) for 45 minutes. Begin heating 2 gallons of water in your brewpot as the grains steep. At the end of the steep, place a colander over your brewpot and place grain bag in it. Rinse grain bag with 2 qts. of hot (170 °F) water. Add “grain tea” from other pot to brewpot, add half of the malt extract and bring to a boil. Boil wort hard for 90 minutes, adding hops at times indicated. Stir in sugar, remaining malt extract and yeast nutrients for the final 15 minutes of the boil. Cool wort and transfer to a sanitized fermenter. Top up to 5 gallons with cool water. Aerate well, pitch yeast and ferment at 70 °F. Keg or bottle condition. (You can keg this and push with nitrogen if you like, but I think it tastes better with “normal” (CO2) bubbles.

 

The Cure from Cork 

(Murphy’s-like Dry Stout/extract, metric uits)

by Chris Colby

 

DESCRIPTION

This is a dry stout reminiscent of Murphy’s Pub Draught, now sold in widget cans. Murphy’s stout is slightly mellower — a little less bitter with a hint of chocolate and caramel in the malt — than Guinness, and (in my opinion) also tastes better when carbonated with CO2, as opposed to pushed with beer gas. If you like session ales — and are disappointed you can’t find Murphy’s except in widget cans — this is a great recipe to try.

 

INGREDIENTS (for 19 L)

 

Water Profile 

80 ppm calcium (Ca+2)

20 ppm magnesium (Mg+2)

240 ppm carbonate (HCO3)

Malts and Other Fermentables

(for an OG of 1.038 at 70% efficiency and an SRM of 41)

910 g English pale ale malt

910 g light dried malt extract

340 g cane sugar

57 g dark crystal malt (90 °L)

85 g chocolate malt

280 g roasted barley (500 °L)

Hops (for 34 IBU total)

Target hops (34 IBUs)

26 g (at 10% alpha acids), boiled for 60 minutes

Yeast (to attenuate to FG 1.007, for an ABV of 4.1%)

White Labs WLP007 (Dry English Ale) yeast

(a 1-L yeast starter is suggested)

Processing Aids and Other 

0.25 tsp. yeast nutrients

110 g corn sugar (to prime bottles for 2.0 volumes of CO2)

 

PROCEDURE

Make yeast starter 2 days before brewing. If milling your own grains, crush dark grains separately from pale malt. (You will likely need to tighten the mill gap a bit for the smaller dark grains.) Put crushed grains in a large steeping bag. (You will have just short of 1.4 kg of grain total). In a large pot (over 5.7 L) other than your brewpot, steep the grains at 66 °C in 3.8 L of brewing liquor (treated brewing water) for 45 minutes. Begin heating 7.6 L of water in your brewpot as the grains steep. At the end of the steep, place a colander over your brewpot and place grain bag in it. Rinse grain bag with 2 qts. of hot (77 °C) water. Add “grain tea” from other pot to brewpot, add half of the malt extract and bring to a boil. Boil wort hard for 90 minutes, adding hops at times indicated. Stir in sugar, remaining malt extract and yeast nutrients for the final 15 minutes of the boil. Cool wort and transfer to a sanitized fermenter. Top up to 19 L with cool water. Aerate well, pitch yeast and ferment at 21 °C. Keg or bottle condition. (You can keg this and push with nitrogen if you like, but I think it tastes better with “normal” (CO2) bubbles.

Comments

  1. I was looking at trying this but I only get a color of 31 SRM when I put the recipe into a few brewing software programs. Should it be something more around 31 SRM? Just want to make sure I’m not missing something.

    • Chris Colby says:

      If you use the Morey formula (as a lot of recipe calculators do), it’ll probably come out to around 31. The way I calculate color gives higher results in darker beers.

  2. What is the type of chocolate you use, and what is its color deg. L?

    • Chris Colby says:

      If I have a choice of chocolate malts, I usually choose an English variety, often around 400–450 °L.

Trackbacks

  1. […] brew a nice session beer, probably a 10-gallon batch. I’ll have to decide between my dry stout (Cure from Cork, which is basically a Murphy’s clone) or a bitter (like Leg of Ordinary Biters). When I brew a […]

  2. […] a dry stout that can be brewed on a simple 3-gallon (11-L) all-grain brewery. It is the same as the 5-gallon (19-L) all-grain recipe, just scaled to 3 gallons (11 L). (There is also a 5-gallon (19-L) partial mash version.) This […]

  3. […] and bitter Guinness-style dry stout and the slightly milder Murphy’s-like stout. (Here’s a recipe for that.) A blend of two dry stouts with different characters could produce an interesting intermediate […]

  4. […] of the time I brew a dry stout, I go with my Cure from Cork recipe — a stout inspired by Murphy’s Stout. However, there is a fairly wide range of flavors within […]

  5. […] I posted the all-grain recipe for my “other” dry stout. When I make dry stout, I usually brew my Murphy’s clone. However, occasionally I’ll brew this one, which is closer to Guinness (although not an attempt […]

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