Stone Double Dry Hopped Ruination Clone

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Stone Ruination IPA, a classic double IPA. Stone Brewing Co. also released some double dry hopped versions of this beer.

Do you like hoppy beers? Well then here’s one for you — Stone’s Ruination IPA (a double IPA) with a double dry hop option. A lot of hops go into this beer, so you’ll want to think about how to separate the wort from the hop debris — whether by giving the chilled wort time to settle, bagging the hops, using a hop screen in the kettle or a hop jack before the chiller. Secondly, try to expose the beer to as little oxygen as possible when dry hopping to retain the freshest hop aroma. This recipe is presented in both all-grain and extract (partial mash) versions, in both English and metric units.

 

Stone Double Dry Hopped Ruination IPA Clone

(Double IPA)

All-grain version, English units

recipe from Mitch Steele, Brewmaster, Stone Brewing Co.

 

DESCRIPTION

Described by Stone as, “A liquid poem to the glory of the hop,” Ruination is big, hoppy double IPA with a huge hop aroma. Stone has also released Ruination in a few Double Dry Hopped versions.

INGREDIENTS (for 5 gallons)

 

Water

dilute water with distilled or RO water, if needed, to below 100 ppm carbonates [bicarbonate ions (HCO3) or “alkalinity as CaCO3”]

add calcium, if needed, to make 100 ppm Ca2+

use 3:1 ratio of gypsum and calcium chloride for adding calcium ions

Malt (for an OG of 1.074 at 85% extract efficiency and 7 SRM)

11 lb. 3 oz. American 2-row pale malt

11 oz. crystal malt (15 °L)

Hops (for 100+ IBU total)

Magnum hops (100+ IBUs)

3.5 oz. (at 12% alpha acids), boiled for 90 mins

Centennial hops

  1.5 oz. (at 10% alpha acids), at knockout or in whirlpool

Chinook hops

0.5 oz. (at 13% alpha acids), at knockout or in whirlpool

Centennial hop

2.6 oz. (at 10% alpha acids), dry hop

Yeast (for an FG of 1.012 and 8.2% ABV)

White Labs WLP007 (Dry English Ale) or White Labs WLP002 (English Ale) yeast

make a 2.0-qt. yeast starter

Other

1 tsp. Irish moss, boiled for 15 mins

 

PROCEDURE

Make yeast starter 2–3 days before brewday. (Adjust the amount of pale malt, if needed, to account for your extract efficiency.) Mash for 60 minutes at 154 °F in 1.4 qts./lb. of brewing liquor. Mash out to 168 °F. Recirculate and collect 7.0 gallons of wort, or enough that a 90-minute boil will yield roughly 5 1/3 gallons post-boil. Boil wort for 90 minutes, adding hops and Irish moss at times indicated. (Option: if your hot break doesn’t look right 15 minutes into the boil, add 0.5 tsp of gypsum.) Chill wort to 70 °F and transfer to fermenter. (You may want to wait and give the hop debris some time, at least an hour, to settle to improve your yield.) Aerate wort and pitch the yeast sediment from your yeast starter. After primary fermentation, at 70 °F, rack the beer off any settled yeast and dry hop (Stone uses pellets both in the boil and for dry hopping). Leave the dry hops in the beer a maximum of 7 days. Avoid exposing the beer to oxygen while dry hopping (or double dry hopping). One way to do this is to add your dry hops to a keg, purge it with CO2 and rack the beer onto the dry hops. (Either have a plan to get the hops out of the keg 7 days later, or push the dry hopped beer with CO2 to another keg purged with CO2.) Drink while the hop character is near it’s maximum.

 

Double Dry Hopped Option:

Note to make the Double Dry-Hopped version, remove the first charge of dry hops and add a second charge of the same amount. You can use more Centennial. Simcoe, Citra or Amarillo also work really well.

 

 

Stone Double Dry Hopped Ruination IPA Clone

(Double IPA)

All-grain version, metric units

recipe from Mitch Steele, Brewmaster, Stone Brewing Co.

 

DESCRIPTION

Described by Stone as, “A liquid poem to the glory of the hop,” Ruination is big, hoppy double IPA with a huge hop aroma. Stone has also released Ruination in a few Double Dry Hopped versions.

 

INGREDIENTS (for 19 L)

 

Water

dilute water with distilled or RO water, if needed, to below 100 ppm carbonates (bicarbonate ions (HCO3) or “alkalinity as CaCO3”)

add calcium, if needed, to make 100 ppm Ca2+

use 3:1 ratio of gypsum and calcium chloride for adding calcium ions

Malt (for an OG of 1.074 at 85% extract efficiency and 7 SRM)

5.1 kg American 2-row pale malt

310 g crystal malt (15 °L)

Hops (for 100+ IBU total)

Magnum hops (100+ IBUs)

99 g (at 12% alpha acids), boiled for 90 mins

Centennial hops

  43 g (at 10% alpha acids), at knockout or in whirlpool

Chinook hops

14 g (at 13% alpha acids), at knockout or in whirlpool

Centennial hop

74 g (at 10% alpha acids), dry hop

Yeast (for an FG of 1.012 and 8.2% ABV)

White Labs WLP007 (Dry English Ale) or White Labs WLP002 (English Ale) yeast

make a 1.9-L yeast starter

Other

1 tsp. Irish moss, boiled for 15 mins

 

PROCEDURE

Make yeast starter 2–3 days before brewday. (Adjust the amount of pale malt, if needed, to account for your extract efficiency.) Mash for 60 minutes at 68 °C in 3 L/kg of brewing liquor. Mash out to 76 °C. Recirculate and collect 26 L of wort, or enough that a 90-minute boil will yield roughly 20 L post-boil. Boil wort for 90 minutes, adding hops and Irish moss at times indicated. (Option: if your hot break doesn’t look right 15 minutes into the boil, add 0.5 tsp of gypsum.) Chill wort to 21 °C and transfer to fermenter. (You may want to wait and give the hop debris some time, at least an hour, to settle to improve your yield.) Aerate wort and pitch the yeast sediment from your yeast starter. After primary fermentation, at 21 °C, rack the beer off any settled yeast and dry hop (Stone uses pellets both in the boil and for dry hopping). Leave the dry hops in the beer a maximum of 7 days. Avoid exposing the beer to oxygen while dry hopping (or double dry hopping). One way to do this is to add your dry hops to a keg, purge it with CO2 and rack the beer onto the dry hops. (Either have a plan to get the hops out of the keg 7 days later, or push the dry hopped beer with CO2 to another keg purged with CO2.) Drink while the hop character is near it’s maximum.

 

Double Dry Hopped Option:

Note to make the Double Dry-Hopped version, remove the first charge of dry hops and add a second charge of the same amount. You can use more Centennial. Simcoe, Citra or Amarillo also work really well.

 

 

Stone Double Dry Hopped Ruination IPA Clone

(Double IPA)

Malt extract adaptation, English units

recipe from Mitch Steele, Brewmaster, Stone Brewing Co.

 

INGREDIENTS (for 5 gallons)

 

Water

 for partial mash:

dilute water with distilled or RO water, if needed, to below 100 ppm carbonates (bicarbonate ions (HCO3) or “alkalinity as CaCO3”)

add calcium, if needed, to make 100 ppm Ca2+

use 3:1 ratio of gypsum and calcium chloride for adding calcium ions

for dilution:

filtered tap water

Malt (for an OG of 1.074 at 85% extract efficiency and 7 SRM)

2 lb. 5 oz. American 2-row pale malt

6.0 lbs. light dried malt extract

11 oz. crystal malt (15 °L)

Hops (for 100+ IBU total)

Magnum hops (100+ IBUs)

3.5 oz. (at 12% alpha acids), boiled for 90 mins

Centennial hops

  1.5 oz. (at 10% alpha acids), at knockout or in whirlpool

Chinook hops

0.5 oz. (at 13% alpha acids), at knockout or in whirlpool

Centennial hop

2.6 oz. (at 10% alpha acids), dry hop

Yeast (for an FG of 1.012 and 8.2% ABV)

White Labs WLP007 (Dry English Ale) or White Labs WLP002 (English Ale) yeast

make a 2.0-qt. yeast starter

Other

1 tsp. Irish moss, boiled for 15 mins

 

PROCEDURE

Make yeast starter 2–3 days ahead of brewday. On brewday, heat 4.1 qts. of brewing liquor to 165 °F and mash grains at 154 °F for 60 minutes. Stir every 8 minutes or so, if you can do so without losing a significant amount of heat. Collect around 1.75 gallons of wort. Add water to make at least 4.0 gallons of wort. Stir in roughly 1/2 of the malt extract, hold at 154 °F for 5 minutes, then bring to a boil. Boil the wort for 90 minutes. (If hot break does not appear as big, fluffy flakes after first 15 minutes of boil, add 0.5 tsp. gypsum.) Add hops and Irish moss at times indicated. Add water, if needed, so boil volume never drops below 3.5 gallons. Dissolve remaining malt extract in wort and stir in with 10 minutes left in boil. (You can do this in shifts.) Chill wort to 70 °F. If using an immersion chiller, swirl chilled wort and let sit for at least an hour (covered) to let hop debris settle. Transfer wort to fermenter, leaving as much hop debris and trub behind as possible. Add water to yield 5.0 gallons. Aerate the wort thoroughly and pitch sediment from yeast starter. Ferment at 70 °F. If dry hopping in a keg, let beer fall (at least mostly) clear before racking. Dry hop for 7 days. Avoid exposing beer to oxygen as much as possible when transferring wort and dry hopping after fermentation.

 

Double Dry Hopped Option:

Note to make the Double Dry-Hopped version, remove the first charge of dry hops and add a second charge of the same amount. You can use more Centennial. Simcoe, Citra or Amarillo also work really well.

 

 

Stone Double Dry Hopped Ruination IPA Clone

(Double IPA)

Malt extract adaptation, metric units

recipe from Mitch Steele, Brewmaster, Stone Brewing Co.

 

INGREDIENTS (for 19 L)

 

Water

 for partial mash:

dilute water with distilled or RO water, if needed, to below 100 ppm carbonates (bicarbonate ions (HCO3) or “alkalinity as CaCO3”)

add calcium, if needed, to make 100 ppm Ca2+

use 3:1 ratio of gypsum and calcium chloride for adding calcium ions

for dilution:

filtered tap water

Malt (for an OG of 1.074 at 85% extract efficiency and 7 SRM)

1.1 kg American 2-row pale malt

2.7 kg light dried malt extract

310 g crystal malt (15 °L)

Hops (for 100+ IBU total)

Magnum hops (100+ IBUs)

99 g (at 12% alpha acids), boiled for 90 mins

Centennial hops

  43 g (at 10% alpha acids), at knockout or in whirlpool

Chinook hops

14 g (at 13% alpha acids), at knockout or in whirlpool

Centennial hop

74 g (at 10% alpha acids), dry hop

Yeast (for an FG of 1.012 and 8.2% ABV)

White Labs WLP007 (Dry English Ale) or White Labs WLP002 (English Ale) yeast

make a 1.9-L yeast starter

Other

1 tsp. Irish moss, boiled for 15 mins

 

PROCEDURE

Make yeast starter 2–3 days ahead of brewday. On brewday, heat 3.9 L of brewing liquor to 74 °C and mash grains at 68 °C for 60 minutes. Stir every 8 minutes or so, if you can do so without losing a significant amount of heat. Collect around 6.6 L of wort. Add water to make at least 8 L of wort. Stir in roughly 1/2 of the malt extract, hold at 68 °C for 5 minutes, then bring to a boil. Boil the wort for 90 minutes. (If hot break does not appear as big, fluffy flakes after first 15 minutes of boil, add 0.5 tsp. gypsum.) Add hops and Irish moss at times indicated. Add water, if needed, so boil volume never drops below 13 L. Dissolve remaining malt extract in wort and stir in with 10 minutes left in boil. (You can do this in shifts.) Chill wort to 21 °C. If using an immersion chiller, swirl chilled wort and let sit for at least an hour (covered) to let hop debris settle. Transfer wort to fermenter, leaving as much hop debris and trub behind as possible. Add water to yield 19 L. Aerate the wort thoroughly and pitch sediment from yeast starter. Ferment at 21 °C. If dry hopping in a keg, let beer fall (at least mostly) clear before racking. Dry hop for 7 days. Avoid exposing beer to oxygen as much as possible when transferring wort and dry hopping after fermentation.

 

Double Dry Hopped Option:

Note to make the Double Dry-Hopped version, remove the first charge of dry hops and add a second charge of the same amount. You can use more Centennial. Simcoe, Citra or Amarillo also work really well.

Comments

  1. Bill Soukoreff says:

    Thanks for a great recipe. So just to clarify, the 2.6 oz hops listed is for one dry hop addition. A double dry hopped version would be 5.2 oz?

  2. I’m curious where you got this recipe from, i.e. from a podcast, from the man himself, etc, because in Mitches IPA book the Ruination IPA recipe only uses Columbus (start of the boil) and Centennial (Whirlpool), and Centennial @ .52oz/gal for Dry hopping. I’m sure the chinook adds a nice layer of spiciness to the mix though. What are your tasting notes of this one? I haven’t tried this recipe yet, but it is on my list of ones to do this year.

    Cheers!

    • Chris Colby says:

      I got the recipe from Mitch Steele (Brewmaster at Stone). Breweries change their formulas all the time due to the availability and pricing of different hop varieties. They may also refine a recipe to make it more to their liking. That may explain the difference. I tasted this beer (the commercial version) in Boston last year and liked it. It was — wait for the surprise — like Ruination with a tiny bit more hop aroma. I haven’t brewed this recipe at home, however.

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